Friday, September 25, 2009

Book Review - Ordinary Injustice: How America Holds Court

The publisher of Ordinary Injustice: How America Hold Court sent me an e-mail with the following teaser for the new book:

"The stories of grave injustice are all too familiar: the lawyer who sleeps through a trial, the false confessions, the convictions of the innocent. However, the less visible failures of justice meted out by America’s defective system receive scant attention unless you’ve personally experienced it. Attorney and journalist Amy Bach has spent the last eight years investigating the chronic lapses in courts across America, and through gripping stories and trenchant analyses, she offers a wholly original understanding of why justice fails on a daily basis for so many people across the country."


Natural curiosity lead me to request a copy for review. I'm glad that I did.

Rather than carpet bombing the reader with story after story of how the justice system fails Americans everyday, the author, Amy Bach, takes you on a well researched journey through a few examples of the system at its worst.

We are a nation of laws, but we have a legal culture based upon expediency - this proves to be quite a bad combination.

Studying leadership and working in within the court system, it was easy to picture the book's examples. I found myself examining the work that I've done, making sure that I wasn't guilty of some of the same failings described in the book. Though I'm sure that many will be uncomfortable with her penetrating, mater-of-fact style - I can't see the book being written any other way.

I'm recommending this book to all who work in my profession. Why? Read it. Sit down with the stories. Digest them. Absorb them. Look at your workplace. Look at your court district. I think you'll see why I'm recommending the book - then you'll recommend it too.

1 comment:

Amy said...

Glad you enjoyed the book. It is indeed supposed to be a book about all of us. Amy Bach